LOGOS – PART 1.

By |2019-06-11T09:00:43+01:00April 11th, 2019|

There is a lot of chat currently around why lots of high-end luxury fashion brands are changing their logos.

The talking point, more specifically, is why do they all now look the same?

YVES SAINT LAURENT.

BALENCIAGA.

BURBERRY.

BERLUTI.

BALMAIN.

There are lots of opinions on this.

Some say it’s so that the images are better for the digital age.

So they work better on screens.

Because they’re less fussy.

Some say it is to shed memories of a past riddled with things that – these days – are considered politically incorrect.

Or just silly and outdated.

Some say it is to create a simple and visual core for the brand.

So the brand can react to a market that is changing faster than ever.

With campaigns that are born, burn brightly, then switch off.

Leaving the simple core to endure.

Some say it’s so that the brands can visually ‘high five’ each other.

Acknowledge that they are part of the one luxury clothing branding elite.

Some say that as categories blur… luxury / premium / luxury streetwear… it’s a way to push the actual physical brand into the background and let the collections speak louder for themselves.

All I know is that it’s interesting.

That these super-brands are actively morphing to all look alike.

My personal view is this…

They do want to flock together.

I think they feel safer that way as new independent brands come in at the bottom end.

I also think they are playing safe for a faster moving and unpredictable future.

This simplicity keeps them as part of the old club but allows them to create innovative campaigns around the edges.

Campaigns that match or react to the current mood.

I understand all that.

I suppose the only think that may be missing, if indeed I am right in any of my assumptions, is adventure.

Risk.

Verve.

Wow-ness.

In summary – a  willingness to be pioneering.

At a strategic level.

I think a brand can get so big and have so many people reliant on it (shareholders, shops, existing customers and the pounds that they spend) that it gets a bit boring.

Scared to pioneering anything.

So it just follows what the market signals that it wants.

Risk.

I am not a fan of just ‘following’ in this short life of ours.

I like brands that go out on a limb.

That DO take risks and stand out.

And say something different.

That stand for something.

So my comments above are not about the similar font styles I don’t think.

They’re more about what this move to sameness might mean.

I hope it does not mean that these brands are becoming followers instead of leaders.

I am actually exploring a similar simplification of the Always Wear Red logo because we are less ‘luxury’ and more ‘premium contemporary.’

So a simpler look feels right to me.

But I will never lose the risk and the adventure behind the brand.

Because I love all that.

And I think our expanding customer base do too.

I love creativity.

And adventure.

I also want to think about the strategic reasons – for me – why I might change the logo.

Because – just so you know – logo design is a primarily strategic and not an aesthetic decision at all.

I’ll go into that more in another story.

Here’s a ‘Business of Fashion’ article highlighting the similarities between these fashion super brands:

https://www.businessoffashion.com/articles/opinion/the-revolution-will-not-be-serifised-why-every-luxury-brands-logo-looks-the-same-burberry-balmain-balenciaga

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About the Author:

Michael Owen
A.STORIES allows us to share what we've learned from advising some of the world's best brands. And from leading our own brands, too. With you. We've been where you're going. So wherever you're headed - with ANGELFYSH at your side you're navigating familiar territory. Please call +44(0)7960 117077 to see how we can help. ANGELFYSH. CONSULTANTS THAT DO.

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